FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
11/22/2013

 Department on Aging hosts annual Memory Loss Conference during Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Two day conference Nov. 22 & 23 in Springfield features seminars

 

SPRINGFIELD – November 22, 2013. The Illinois Department on Aging (IDoA) today opened the 2013 Memory Loss Conference to address issues of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, and related disorders. The two day conference runs all day and tomorrow (November 23), at the Crowne Plaza in Springfield. Today’s agenda offers education and information to benefit professionals who work in healthcare, aging, and caregiving. Tomorrow’s agenda is geared toward the general public, especially care partners, friends and family of individuals with a memory loss disorder.

“Each year we present the latest information regarding research, treatment, and effective ways to improve the lives of persons with dementia as well as innovative approaches to compassionate care. And by hosting this two day conference in November we symbolically observe National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month,” said IDoA Director John K. Holton, Ph.D.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. It is an incurable neurological disorder that destroys the brain’s memory cells, causes problems with thinking and behavior and progressively gets worse over time. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States where more than five million people currently are living with Alzheimer’s disease. That number is predicted to double in 20 years, which shows there is a need for information, resources and support.

IDoA presents the 18th annual conference, this year, in conjunction with co-sponsors the Alzheimer’s Association, St. John’s Hospital, and Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and Center for Alzheimer Disease and Related Disorders.

For more information about programs to assist older adults in Illinois and their caregivers, call the Department on Aging Senior HelpLine at 1-800-252-8966 or for TTY (hearing impaired use only) call 1-888-206-1327.

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