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Recovery Resources

DISASTER CASE MANAGEMENT

The American Red Cross works one-on-one with households impacted by disasters. A disaster case manager can help you develop and carry out a Disaster Recovery Plan. This partnership provides the client with a single point of contact to facilitate access to a broad range of resources, promoting sustainable assistance for an individual's and a household's recovery.

EMERGENCY HOUSING AND TRANSITIONAL HOUSING 

Emergency and transitional housing providers give immediate shelter services to homeless persons and persons at risk of becoming homeless.

EXPECT OFFICIALS TO VISIT YOUR HOME

As you recover, there are several different organizations and agencies that might send representatives to your home. These can include Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) inspectors, local officials, and insurance adjusters. Learn more about these representatives at Who’s Knocking at Your Door.

FARM AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) can help Illinois farmers prepare, recover and build long-term resilience to all natural disasters, including floods. The USDA Disaster Resource Center has information about specific disasters to connect farmers with state and local assistance.

HOUSING

The Illinois Department of Human Services can help Illinoisans find affordable, accessible housing for those impacted by recent floods.

MORTGAGE ASSISTANCE 

The Illinois Housing Search can help Illinoisans find affordable, accessible housing for those impacted by recent floods.

TAX WAIVERS

The Illinois Department of Revenue has announced that taxpayers (or individuals and businesses) affected by flooding in one of the 34 declared disaster counties may request waivers of penalties and interest for state taxes if they cannot file their returns or make payments on time. Taxpayers seeking waivers should send a brief written explanation to the Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) along with their name, account number (or last four social security digits), address, and an estimation when they can file.

REBUILDING

CONTRACTORS

General contractors are not required by state law to be licensed, but municipalities may require permits or have other local requirements. Home and business owners should check with their local governments for more information about permits or other local requirements before hiring anyone.

Roofers must be licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR). People can verify they are doing business with a licensed roofer by visiting www.idfpr.com and using the License Look-Up page.
  • Website: IDFPR Home
  • Phone number: 1-888-473-4858
  • Hours of Operation: 8:00am – 5:00pm

FLOOD INSURANCE

If you have flood insurance, report your loss immediately to your insurance agent. Additional helpful information is available online at How Do I Start My Flood Claim or you can call 1-800-427-4661. You may also be eligible for up to $30,000 to help elevate your home. Talk to your insurance agent and ask about “Increased Cost of Compliance” (or ICC) coverage.

INSURANCE ADJUSTERS

Insurance adjusters must be licensed by the Illinois Department of Insurance.

REBUILD RESPONSIBLY

A permit is required before you rebuild – Contact your local building department. Rebuilding without a permit is unsafe, against the law, and could subject you to fines based to local floodplain regulations.

Your local building department must conduct a damage assessment of the building. This inspection will determine if a structure is more than 50% damaged (substantially damaged). If your home or other structure is found to be substantially damaged, the structure may not be repaired until it meets current flood protection requirements. You must contact your local building department before repairing any flood damage.

Buyout money is currently available to local communities. If you are interested in being bought out, please contact your community and ask them to contact the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) Office of Water Resources and IEMA (Mitigation Programs) for additional information. Keep copies of all receipts in case you receive a buyout offer.

SCAMS

Attorney General Kwame Raoul is warning Illinois residents to be on alert for scammers looking to exploit homeowners and business owners who may be in need of repairs from flood damage. These “storm chasers” use the opportunity to pressure people into making quick and often expensive decisions about cleanup and construction work.
  • Website: Protecting Consumers 
  • 1-800-386-5438 (Chicago)
  • 1-800-243-0618 (Springfield)
  • 1-800-243-0607 (Carbondale)
  • 1-866-310-8398 (Español)

HEALTH AND SAFETY DURING FLOOD CLEANUP

FLOOD CLEAN UP

As residents begin to return home, it is important that people in these areas protect themselves from disease and other environmental hazards often associated with floodwaters. The Illinois Department of Public Health can provide information that flood victims can use to protect themselves in the days and weeks following a flood. To avoid illness it is important for people whose homes have been affected by flooding to make sure their water is safe to drink, what food needs to be thrown out, and how to properly clean all items and surfaces touched by floodwaters.

LEGAL ASSISTANCE

The Illinois Department on Aging provides legal assistance to older Illinoisans with civil legal problems. To locate legal assistance services in your community, contact...
  • View legal assistance services in your community
  • To view services available in your area through our Area Agency on Aging, visit our Provider Profile
  • You can always call the Senior HelpLine with any questions. 1-800-252-8966

SAFE DISPOSAL OF DEBRIS

After floodwaters recede and storms have passed, debris remains that can cause serious pollution problems and potentially result in ill health effects. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (Illinois EPA) has developed this fact sheet for municipalities and residents to outline what you can do to ensure that the waste and debris are disposed of in a safe and environmentally sound manner.

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITIONAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (SNAP) FOOD REPLACEMENT

Food bought with SNAP benefits may be replaced if destroyed in a disaster or due to a power outage of at least 4 hours.

TAKE PHOTOS AND KEEP RECEIPTS BEFORE YOU CLEAN UP

You may proceed with cleanup activities and temporary emergency repairs to prevent further deterioration, such as preventing the spread of mold and/or mildew, without a permit. These activities and repairs include:

  • Removing and disposing of damaged contents, carpeting, wallboard, and insulation
  • Hosing and scrubbing or cleaning floors, walls, and ductwork
  • Covering holes in roofs or walls and covering windows
  • Removing sagging ceilings, shoring up broken foundations, and other actions to make the building safe to enter
Before you begin cleanup or emergency repairs, remember to take photos to show the condition of the building both inside and outside. This may be needed for your insurance adjuster. Additionally, keep copies of all receipts for ay commercial clean up and debris removal.

REPLACING DOCUMENTS

HOW DO I REPLACE LOST DOCUMENTS? 

Find resources to help you replace documents that have been destroyed or lost in the floods.

VOLUNTEERS

DISASTER VOLUNTEERS

In response to recent and ongoing disaster events, local emergency management officials are getting organized and assessing needs. To be ready, we urge interested volunteers to pre-register and indicate interest in volunteering in the event of a disaster or learn about current openings for volunteers.